@READ KINDLE ⚡ Предел забвения ¹ eBook or E-pub free

The imagery in this book was almost overwhelming at points it was written so well Every sentence was a new scene painted on a fresh canvas that were interwoven into a magnificent collage The story also is important unto itself for the preservation of a culture and history in a nation that has its secrets Not a book you find yourself tearing through because you get caught up in the visuals, but rather one you sit back and enjoy for its excellent prose and almost involuntary contemplation. It s probably just me, but while I think the subject matter is incredible, the constant bombardment of metaphors and similes really kept me from enjoying this novel it made it hard to mentally catch my breath while moving from one image to the next with little room between Couldn t even finish it. @READ KINDLE · Предел забвения ñ Il Romanzo Di Lebedev Continua Il Lavoro Di Scrittori Come Aleksandr Sol Enicyn O Varlam Alamov DER SPIEGEL Fin Dalla Nascita Anzi Ancor Prima Si Instaura Un Legame Segreto Tra Il Giovane Protagonista Del Romanzo E Il Vicino Di Casa, Un Anziano Silenzioso E Cieco Che Pian Piano Prende Il Posto Dei Due Nonni Morti In Guerra Su Di Lui Girano Voci E Sospetti Ma Nessuno Conosce Il Suo Passato E Nemmeno Al Bambino, Che Un Po Lo Teme, Dato Di Sapere Qualcosa Eppure Quando La Violenza Politica Scuote La Russia E I Carri Armati Sono In Strada Per Il Golpe Del , Il Vecchio Cieco Sacrifica La Propria Vita Per Salvare Quella Del BambinoChi Era Veramente Quell Uomo Cosa Aveva Fatto Per Dover Celare Il Proprio Passato A Tutti Inizia Cos Una Lunga Indagine Che Porter Il Protagonista Prima Ragazzo E Poi Adulto Nei Vasti Territori Del Grande Nord Siberiano Quello Che Trova, Tra Le Miniere Dimenticate, Le Caserme E Gli Ex Gulag, Un Mondo Relegato Nell Oblio, Dove Tutto Ormai Viene Ignorato Sia Le Vittime Sia I CarneficiUn Racconto Inquietante E Magnifico, Dalla Scrittura Raffinata E Ricca Per Un Opera Di Portata E Profondit Rare Che Evoca L Incredibile E Violata Bellezza Di Una Terra In Cui L Uomo, La Macchina E La Natura Hanno Collaborato Nell Annichilimento Di Milioni Di Vite Durante Il Secolo SovieticoUn Romanzo Magistrale, Un Tentativo Epico E Letterario Di Salvare La Storia Dall OblioTradotto In Moltissime Lingue, Questo Esordio Per Il Wall Street Journal Tra I Romanzi Dell Anno Pubblicati Negli Stati Uniti Svela Uno Scrittore Di Grande Talento Letterario, Con Il Passo E La Potenza Evocativa Dei Grandi Scrittori Russi Sergei Lebedev s Oblivion was shortlisted for the 2017 Best Translated Book Award and from comments on the Mookse and Gripes forum perhaps the best received among readers.I started to read this on a flight from London to Korea an 11 hour flight, a large part of which is spent flying over the vast area of Siberia, home of the gulags and labour camps in Soviet Russia see Lebedev s moving debut novel tackles th Sergei Lebedev s Oblivion was shortlisted for the 2017 Best Translated Book Award and from comments on the Mookse and Gripes forum perhaps the best received among readers.I started to read this on a flight from London to Korea an 11 hour flight, a large part of which is spent flying over the vast area of Siberia, home of the gulags and labour camps in Soviet Russia see Lebedev s moving debut novel tackles the relatively underexplored, once suppressed, topic The novel consists of three parts The first doesn t directly address the camps at all, but rather focuses on the childhood of the first person narrator, and, in particular his interaction with an elderly man, living close to his family s dacha, clearly a figure of some former significance in the Soviet regime but whose exact provenance is sketchy, indeed people seem reluctant to probe into his history and he has little interaction with his neighbours It wasn t that he kept himself aloof, taciturn, it wasn t about his behaviour or character he was alienated from life almost in the legal sense of the word and only as a consequence of that was he alienated from people as well Everything that happened in the present did not involve him directly but only brushed against him not because he was unreceptive but because he seemed to have already lived his life, his existence outlasting his destiny.But the man who the boy knows as Grandfather II though not a blood relation, becomes closely involved in the boy s life, beginning when his mother is pregnant with him but is advised by the doctors that the pregnancy is dangerous to her health A debate ensues, involving in laws on both sides, as to whether to terminate the pregnancy, until Grandfather II intervenes decisively in favour of carrying to term He said that she should definitely have the baby, medicine was advanced now and that the doctors were being overly cautious He listed births in trolley cars, the lamp room of a mine shaft, a cornfield, on a Central Asian steppe near the space center, in a bakery, a dentist s chair, a bomb shelter Aattentive listener would have recognized that Grandfather II was inventing these incidents, choosing such images from the life he knew or from newspapers, but he filled and overpopulated the room with these unexpectedly born infants.He begged her so persistently to have the baby, pleaded with her to fear nothing, that no one ever thought he was asking for himselfThere s is a relationship with little affection the boy suggest Grandfather II treats him as a pet, but even that implies too much of a relationship a domestic animal may be a better description with Grandfather II feeling only responsible for his welfare At the section s end Grandfather II rescues the boy from a near fatal attack by a wild dog, then, against the advice of the doctors, donates his own blood to save the boy s life at the ultimate expense of his own the blood loss weakens him, but as the accident coincides with a day of severe political turmoil in the Soviet regime, he is unable to obtain the medical help he needs.The novel explores how people coped with their memories of the excesses of the Stalinist regime The adults tried if not to forget the time about which Grandfather II could have spoken, then at least to make it palatable for their own private memory They broke it up into small impressions, personal stories what an ice hill there was by the ravine, now covered up what nits, all with rotten, wrinkled kernels, they once bought at the market to make jam what pale, water diluted ink they used to pour into the inkwells at school, and them the teacher complained she couldn t read anything in their notebooks That kind of stuff was like keys, wallet, and papers that you could stuff into your pockets when you go out it was small, domesticated everyone diligently reinforced the little sport of personal memory, and no one remembered the collective.As the boy grows up he becomes a geologist as indeed Lebedev did , in part to get away from his home and explore the wider fringes of the Soviet Union He finds himself in Siberia where he encounters the legacy of the labour camps I saw that a great force of compulsion had erected the town, cleared the forest, laid the roads, dug the canals, and built the factories but it turned out that compulsion is incapable of one thing the effort a person brings to work freely chosen Without that effort, without that bit of spiritual labour that merges with physical labour, all the roads, bridges, cities and factories were held up only by the will of the state that had them built When that will had vanished, when its time had passed, people were left with a legacy of great construction in which spiritually they were not involved Many people were deprived of life, of fate, of freedom, in the context of that enormous, all accompanying evil any lesser evil became invisible it became possible to live where everything from the look of the housing to speech dehumanized instead of humanized the camp and the housing from former inmates expanded, settled in, and began producing itself without the state s involvement My passage through these parts, changed by the camps, became my path of return to Grandfather II and his life and works.In the third part he tries to trace Grandfather II s history, only to find that the town he visits was founded from one of the same labour camps The town was named for a Bolshevik killed in the mid 1930s the name of the town communicated nothing of the place to its name They spoke different languages and avoided each other The area s mountains bore names given to them by local ethnic groups these names left the sensation of raw meat and gnawed bones in your throat reading a dozen names on the map was like drinking thick blood tat was steaming in the cold the names were redolent of campfire smoke, fish scales, rawhide, canine and human sweat, they were long and the syllables joined up like reindeer or dogs in harness.The town name two syllables, with an sk ending gave away its alienness, the Bolshevik s name looked good on a big map of the country where the names of his comrades formed a toponymic constellation, a lifetime and posthumous pantheon, but up close the name seemed ridiculous, a random collection of letters which the residents got used to and considered themselves dwellers of Abracadab sk.There he finds about Grandfather II s senior and sinister role in the administration of the labour camps, but also the story of Grandfather II s own son and his early death And he goes on further than Grandfather II into the very distant edges of Siberia where the most condemned exiles were sent to establish communities, in the full expectation that they would likely perish in the process I still had to go to the river and find the exiles island I had to travel the entire trajectory of Grandfather II s fate I felt that there, in that book that even he did not know fully, was a limit I called it the limit of oblivion.The novel was translated by Antonina W Bouis, a new translator for me but one with an impressive resume, and the resulting novel reads beautifully in English The sun had filled the lake at the foot of the mountains with light convex, like a drop on glass, its contour struck me in the eye A mean trick of nature, a joke that had waited several million years the lake looked like Lenin s profile, which was imprinted on us by medals, badges, stamps, statues, paintings, and drawings in books.The lake with its thick, almost pastry like icing of sunny light seemed like a monstrous monument, monstrous because the natural forms easily and willingly took on the features of something man made, and this acceptance, without coercion, clearly evinced the meaningless, memory less existence of nature, which we had anthropomorphized much too frequently.Seeing this betrayal of matter betrayal of the men who climbed up to the heaps every day from the barracks, looking at the profile of the dead leader in whose name they were forced to labor I rejected the feeling of closeness with these mountains, from the line of imagination that had anthropomorphized them A different, older feeling arose the possible humanity of nature was just a mockery, a devilish joke man can count on no one in nature except himself.However, this can actually be a weakness of the novel the prose was laid on a little too lyrically thick it wasn t the stout bodied passerines of 10 04 , perhaps closer to Andrei Makine, but at times the novel felt like wading through, admittedly very sweet and tasty, syrup.The coincidence of the narrator first visiting the labour camps as a geologist and then later discovering Grandfather II s connection with them seemed a little unnecessary particularly at one rather contrived plot point where his life is saved by recognising an assailant as the brother of an escaped convict that he had tried to help some time before , although there is some basis for this coincidence in Lebedev s own family history flawed but necessary I prefer the actual winner, the Chronicle of the Moving House, as well as the shortlisted Ladivine, but this was certainly an excellent discovery from the BTBA list VERDICT Powerful, intense, and poetic evocation of Soviet prison camps Reading like a detective story, it will haunt the reader and help him escape oblivion Unforgettable.my full review is here I liked and did not like this novel at the same time,thus the mixed review On one hand,it was an interesting story and mystery of a man searching the truth about a person from his past On the other hand ,the prose was overly drawn out and hard to read In short,a little too artsy for my taste. Lots of layers and tangents Almost too poetic in places, but the descent into past is documented beautifully I m fascinated with gulags and the collective amnesia which has struck Russians over this part of their history. sergei lebedev s oblivion predel zabvenyais his first novel and the first of his books to be translated into english, with the year of the comet to follow this year with exquisite prose and ample metaphor, lebedev confronts the legacy of russia s often dark past, melding a poetic style and an emotional abundance though not a coming of age tale in an traditional sense, oblivion follows its young narrator from youth to adulthood, as he tries to make sense of all that s come before both pe sergei lebedev s oblivion predel zabvenyais his first novel and the first of his books to be translated into english, with the year of the comet to follow this year with exquisite prose and ample metaphor, lebedev confronts the legacy of russia s often dark past, melding a poetic style and an emotional abundance though not a coming of age tale in an traditional sense, oblivion follows its young narrator from youth to adulthood, as he tries to make sense of all that s come before both personally and politically poignant and haunting, lebedev s debut is a gorgeous work of uncompromising fiction and then you understand that the deathly communion was not accidental through it, as through newly granted vision, you see your body, your memory, your fate as predestination the inheritance of blood, the inheritance of memories, the inheritance of other lives everything wants to speak, seeks to complete itself, to happen to the end, to be recognized and mourned translated from the russian by antonina w bouis dovlatov, tolstaya, bulgakov, et al I felt obliviated and terrified by the visceral imagery in this examination of the USSR s murderous past The allegory and the reality smacked me across the face and instilled that terror I feel when I think about why we are here on earth, God, the absence of God, the horror of humanity, my insignificance, outer space and looming death immortality Prose poetry, stumbling through fog and allusion and literal death The penultimate scene is a doozy Nightmares tonight for sure.In an article by Le I felt obliviated and terrified by the visceral imagery in this examination of the USSR s murderous past The allegory and the reality smacked me across the face and instilled that terror I feel when I think about why we are here on earth, God, the absence of God, the horror of humanity, my insignificance, outer space and looming death immortality Prose poetry, stumbling through fog and allusion and literal death The penultimate scene is a doozy Nightmares tonight for sure.In an article by Lebedev, he describes a real moment in his life when he figured out a very significant thing was not at all what he had assumed This moment combined with his travels east and north compelled him to tell his idiosyncratic version of the gulag archipelago and post Soviet Russia I most certainly did not understand much of what he tried to convey I ve been to places in the former Soviet Union, talked to many people there and here, read a lot, studied Russian Oblivion can probably be truly felt and digested by someone who lived there and lived through at least the lies, if not the horror, of the great experiment of communist tyranny.One of my stock phrases pops up yet again It s really tough to maintain a healthy nation when the past is not dealt with Japan seems to be pulling it off Russia, not so much The book depressed the hell out of me, but I felt I had to go there Trump s victory coincided with me finishing Oblivion so I m extra sickened OTOH, Trump is no Stalin So I have that for solace as I try to get through the next 4 years Trump is no Stalin Happy face emoji.Though I have not could not read it in the original Russian, I m betting this is a first rate translation The translator, A Bouis, has a real way with words I want to thank the publisher and the Goodreads Giveaway program for sending me this book in return for an honest review I give this book 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 out of 5.This was a book overwhelmed with imagery Much of the book takes place in dream sequences or in the narrator s mind The premise of the book is the narrator trying to find outabout the man he knew as Grandfather II This man was not his actual grandfather, but did watch over him as he grew up Grandfather II dies I want to thank the publisher and the Goodreads Giveaway program for sending me this book in return for an honest review I give this book 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 out of 5.This was a book overwhelmed with imagery Much of the book takes place in dream sequences or in the narrator s mind The premise of the book is the narrator trying to find outabout the man he knew as Grandfather II This man was not his actual grandfather, but did watch over him as he grew up Grandfather II dies and leaves the narrator his small house and everything in it He finds some letters and decides to find the man who wrote the letters.His quest leads him into the remains of former Soviet gulags.Some examples of imagery He sought it in questions he must have heard not only the words but also how they bumped into one another, head on or obliquely The objects stood there, huddled in bunches like sheep without a shepherd I took a long time to read this book, starting it on Feb 16, reading it for 6 days, then putting it aside until March 19 and finishing it on March 23.The translation was excellent